09. 2011 - MIN: Please, lend me

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda, You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me!" 


 
CHILDREN OF WINTER 1973 
 
We are the children of winter 1973
 
You dreamt us first at dawn at the end of the battles
 
You were tired men that thanked their good luck
 

You were worried young women and you wanted so much to love

When you conceived us with love in winter 1973

You wanted to fill up with your bodies that what the war finished

And we were born the country was wounded and sad

You looked at us you hugged us you were trying to find comfort

When we were born the elders blessed with tears in their eyes

They said:" we wish those kids will not have to go to the army"

And your faces in the old picture prove

That you said it form the bottom of your hearts

When you promised to do every thing for us

To make an enemy into a loved one

You promised a dove,

an olive tree leaf,

you promised peace

You promised spring at home and blossoms

You promised to fulfill promises, you promised a dove


We are the children of winter 1973

We grew up and now in the army

with our weapon and helmet on our heads

We know how to make love to laugh and cry

We are men we are women

and we too dream about babies

This is why we will not pressure you we will demand of you

And we will not threaten you

When we were young you said promises need to be kept

We will give you strength if that is what you need

We will not hold back

We just wanted to whisper

We are the children of that winter in the year 1973


You promised a dove,

an olive tree leaf,

you promised peace

You promised spring at home and blossoms

You promised to fulfill promises,

you promised a dove


About the song:

A very famous Israeli poem, written by Shmuel Hasfari, called ‘The Children of Winter 1973’ describes the
 
process by which the children who were conceived during the 1973 Yom Kippur War become disillusioned with
 
the promises of the old generation of a peaceful future with no wars. One line in the poem says: ‘You promised to
 
do everything for us, to turn an enemy into a loved one’; it remained the echoing unfulfilled promise for the
 
following generations.
  

This poem became the pledge taken by one of Israel’s most loved prime ministers, Yitzhak Rabin, who was

assassinated by an Israeli citizen fourteen years ago. Rabin, who maintained for most of his public life the image
 
of a handsome, brave and much admired soldier, decided to abandon the path of hate and dedicated his later
 
years to keeping the promise‘to turn an enemy into a loved one’.

He used Hasfari’s poem as a source of inspiration, and in times of great grief allowed its words to fill him with the

patience, strength and hope necessary to shed off the heavy armour of a warrior and wear the uniform of peace.

 
26.10.12 - Hon Minister
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